MISSION INTANGIBLE

M:I Products

MISSION:INTANGIBLE, the blog of the Intangible Asset Finance Society, offers critical comments on intangible asset, corporate reputation, and finance; supplemented by quantitative reputation metrics. Intangible assets include business processes, patents, trademarks; reputations for ethics and integrity; quality, safety, sustainability, security, and resilience; and comprise 70% of the average company's value. MISSION:INTANGIBLE is a registered trademark of the Intangible Asset Finance Society.

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Activist Investors Have a New Bloodlust: CEOs

C. HUYGENS - Wednesday, May 17, 2017
Emotionally charged disappointed activist investors existential threat to CEOs as #reputation #risk roars through the boardroom and into the corner office. Culpability insurance is in limited supply and demand is growing.

Activist investors, a perennial nuisance for chief executives, are becoming an existential threat. Since January, they have helped push out the leaders of three high-profile S&P 500 companies: insurance giant American International Group Inc., railroad CSX Corp. and aerospace-parts maker Arconic Inc. They are gunning for the CEOs at other companies including Buffalo Wild Wings Inc. and Avon Products Inc.


Read more in the Wall Street Journal.

For Personal Protection, CEOs Need Reputation Assurance

C. HUYGENS - Wednesday, May 17, 2017
Why the expressive power of #Reputation Assurance is imperative: When activists attack, “you don’t ever hear the management or board side because they’re the defence, and the defence doesn’t talk.”

Jeff Ubben, chief executive of ValueAct, an activist fund that keeps its pressure behind the scenes, said the recent ouster of Mr Kleinfeld was an example of companies being “bullied” by Elliott. Mr Kleinfeld was forced out not because of Elliott’s criticisms of his record at Arconic but because of what his board called “poor judgment” in sending a letter to an official at Elliott that the hedge fund said “read as a threat to intimidate or extort”.

“It’s prosecutorial in nature,” said Mr Ubben, speaking on a panel at the Milken Conference in Los Angeles earlier this month. “You hear the Elliott side, but you don’t ever hear the management or board side because they’re the defence, and the defence doesn’t talk . . . And then when you do strike back, you’re fired.”


Read more in the Financial Times.

Why Boards Today Need Reputation Insurances

C. HUYGENS - Tuesday, May 16, 2017
Reputation insurance is an important part of any company’s risk management strategy, according to Dr Nir Kossovsky of Steel City Re

Directors are learning the hard way that they may personally be more vulnerable than the well-known corporate brands they oversee. Directors are being targeted and replaced, with 16 percent of board members at companies we studied having been replaced after reputational events.

On average, a corporate board member makes about $250,000 per year to sit on a board and usually serves on more than one. If a reputational attack leads to that board member stepping down—and potentially not being asked to serve on additional boards—it could represent significant lost personal income
.

Read more from Captive Insurance Times

RepuStars 2017 May 13

C. HUYGENS - Saturday, May 13, 2017

Weekly Reputation Index Metrics


At the close of trading May 12, 2017, REPUSPX, REPUVART, and REPUVAR stood at 5461.78, 4246.45 and 3365.71 respectively. Over the past four weeks, the three have changed by 3.81%, 4.39%, and 4.30%. The benchmark S&P500 Composite Index stood at 2082.52 (31 Dec 2001=1000) and has changed over the past four weeks by 2.66%. The current calendar year spread between REPUVAR and the S&P500 is 2.52%.

Over the trailing twelve months, REPUVART and REPUVAR have, respectively, changed by 24.32% and 22.37% respectively; the S&P500 Composite Index has changed by 15.83%. The trailing 12-month spread between REPUVAR and the S&P500 is 6.54%.

Over the trailing 36 months, the REPUVART and REPUVAR have changed by 15.61% and 10.19% respectively; the S&P 500 Composite Index has changed by 26.01%.

The trailing 12-month, and trailing 36-month returns for REPUSPX are 23.27%, and 26.01% respectively. The trailing 12-month spread between REPUSPX and the S&P500 is 7.44%.

The spreads between the S&P500-only index informed by reputation metrics, REPUSPX, and the broad market index informed by reputation metrics, REPUVAR, for the calendar year and for the trailing twelve months respectively are -2.14% and -0.90%.

Side Note: A description of the portfolio constituents and historical returns data from December 31, 2001 can be obtained on request from Technology Option Capital, its manager. Click Here.

Background

The RepuStars® Variety Corporate Reputation Index calculated by S&P/Dow Jones Indexes is the first-ever composite equity index based on a quantitative value strategy informed by the Steel City Re Reputational Value Metrics. The metrics comprise non-financial indicators of reputational value (RVM) and ranking (CRR).
The RepuStars Variety Corporate Reputation Index has two versions: a total returns index and a price index, whose ticker symbols are, respectively, REPUVART and REPUVAR.  Click on the ticker names for real time quotes.

The RepuStars Variety Corporate Reputation Index tracks up to 57 company stocks that appear to be underpriced relative to  Steel City Re’s proprietary Reputational Value Metrics™, which track 7400 companies weekly. The principles behind measuring reputational value are described in the book, Reputation, Stock Price, and You: Why the market rewards some companies and punishes others (2012, Apress).

The RepuStars indices are reconstituted annually in the first week of January and posted by S&P/Dow Jones Indexes in the third week. The Indices were last reconstituted at the close of the markets 23 January 2017.

REPUSPX  is a pocket index with portfolio constituents being selected algorithmically by the same criteria as the constituents for REPUVAR and REPUVART, except that the field of eligible companies is limited to constituents of the S&P500 composite equity index. Click here for an analysis of periodic returns.

The design of the portfolio is governed by principles of behavioral economics, market signaling, and the implicit timing arbitrage between the behaviors of equity stakeholder and all other stakeholders.

Reputation, Risk and Finance

Join our community on Linked-In and stay in the information flow and/or follow Twitter missives at #ReputationRisk.

Notices

S&P Dow Jones Indices is a registered trademark of S&P Dow Jones Indices LLC, a part of McGraw Hill Financial; RepuStars and Steel City Re” are registered trademarks of C. Huygens & Co. LLC. The method underpinning the RepuStars Variety indexes is subject to a pending patent assigned to C. Huygens & Co. LLC. S&P McGraw Hill Financial and its affiliate (S&P Dow Jones Indices) makes no representation or warranty, express or implied, as to the ability of any index to accurately represent the asset class or market sector that it purports to represent and McGraw Hill Financial shall have no liability for any errors, omissions, or interruptions of any index or the data included therein. Past performance of an index is not an indication of future results. All information provided by S&P Dow Jones Indices is general in nature and not tailored to the needs of any person, entity or group of persons. S&P Dow Jones Indices receives compensation in connection with licensing its indices to third parties. It is not possible to invest directly in an index. Exposure to an asset class represented by an index is available through investable instruments offered by third parties that are based on that index. S&P Dow Jones Indices does not sponsor, endorse, sell, promote or manage any investment fund or other investment vehicle that seeks to provide an investment return based on the performance of any Index. Investment products based on the RepuStars Variety Corporate Reputation Indexes are not sponsored, endorsed, sold or promoted by Technology Option Capital, LLC, C. Huygens & Co, LLC, Steel City Re, LLC, or their respective affiliates and none of Technology Option Capital, LLC, C. Huygens & Co, LLC, Steel City Re, LLC and their respective affiliates make any representation regarding the advisability of investing in such products. Inclusion of a company in any of the indexes in this piece does not in any way reflect an opinion of Technology Option Capital, LLC, C. Huygens & Co, LLC, Steel City Re, LLC or any of their respective affiliates on the investment merits of such company. None of Technology Option Capital, LLC, C. Huygens & Co, LLC, Steel City Re, LLC or any of their respective affiliates is providing investment advice in connection with these indexes.

Expectations for Cyber Security

C. HUYGENS - Saturday, May 13, 2017
Reputation risk results from emotionally charged disappointment brought on by perceived failures in ethics, innovation, quality, safety, sustainability and security. Patients and regulators expect reasonable security; known vulnerabilities create #reputation #risk. Use NIST 800-53.

Authorities around the world are scrambling to tackle one of the most virulent cyber attacks to date, as fears mount over the safety of huge amounts of sensitive data, ranging from medical records to corporate databases. Hospitals across the UK have been severely disrupted; postal delivery and logistics services hit in the US and university networks in China shut down. Some of Europe’s biggest companies have been affected, including Telefónica, the Spanish mobile phone giant, Deutsche Bahn, the German national railway operator and Renault, the French carmaker. Russia’s interior ministry said more than 1,000 of its computers had been taken offline.

Read more in the Financial Times.

Expectations for the Short Haul

C. HUYGENS - Friday, May 12, 2017
#reputation #risk. CEOs in UK can expect a short run; are long-term incentives less valuable?

Average time heading a company can seem short, but CEOs may be cheered to know that their staying power compares favourably with UK football managers, whose average tenure is 1.23 years.

Read more in the Financial Times.

The Wall Street Fear Gauge, Stuck NearAero

C. HUYGENS - Friday, May 12, 2017
Emotionally charged disappointed activist investors existential threat to CEOs as #reputation #risk roars through the boardroom and into the corner office. Culpability insurance is in limited supply and demand is growing.

…the trend is good, and the fundamentals are improving. All else being equal, this should support stock prices. But neither fact should distract from the reality that those prices are very high already — or the fact that high valuations do not need good fundamental reasons to revert towards to more normal levels. The stock market is not spookily quiet. It is spookily expensive.

Read more in the Financial Times.

Expectations for Quality Accounting

C. HUYGENS - Thursday, May 11, 2017
#risk Alan Greenspan noted in 2008 that in a business based on trust, #reputation has significant value.

The UK’s accounting watchdog has fined professional services firm PwC a record £5m for “misconduct” in relation to the audit of Connaught, a FTSE 250 social housing maintenance group put into administration in 2010.…The latest ruling is another blow to PwC’s reputation following its Oscars envelope mishap and a $3.1bn legal battle with MF Global in the US.

Read more in the Financial Times.

Paying Down the Costs of a Reputation Crisis

C. HUYGENS - Tuesday, May 09, 2017
More going-forward costs of #reputation #risk -- now burning furniture.

San Francisco-based bank Wells Fargo & Co. is considering selling its insurance brokerage unit for about $2 billion, Bloomberg reported Tuesday.

Citing “people familiar with the matter,” Bloomberg said Wells Fargo is contacting private equity firms to determine the interest in Wells Fargo Insurance Services USA Inc. The bank is planning to move forward with a sale, Bloomberg reported, but it hasn’t set a timeline for holding a formal auction, one of the people said.


Read more in the Business Insurance.

Paying the Ongoing Costs of a Reputation Crisis

C. HUYGENS - Monday, May 08, 2017
#Reputation #Risk “Corporate names are resilient: when their images get damaged, a change of management or strategy will often revive their fortunes. But personal reputations are fragile: mess with them and it can be fatal,” wrote John Gapper for the Financial Times in August, 2016.

Wells Fargo is preparing to unveil new cost-cutting measures as the scandal-hit US bank tries to rebuild Wall Street’s confidence after a bruising annual meeting with shareholders.

Tim Sloan, chief executive, is this week expected to reveal plans for annual savings at Wells, the world’s third-biggest bank by market capitalisation, of as much as $3bn — on top of an existing $2bn expense-reduction plan.


Read more in the Financial Times.

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