MISSION INTANGIBLE

M:I Products

MISSION:INTANGIBLE, the blog of the Intangible Asset Finance Society, offers critical comments on intangible asset, corporate reputation, and finance; supplemented by quantitative reputation metrics. Intangible assets include business processes, patents, trademarks; reputations for ethics and integrity; quality, safety, sustainability, security, and resilience; and comprise 70% of the average company's value. MISSION:INTANGIBLE is a registered trademark of the Intangible Asset Finance Society.

Read future M:I posts via RSS RSS

No Country for Old (Insurance) Captives

C. HUYGENS - Friday, August 25, 2017
Attention captives bearing reputation risk, review programs…implement immediate changes. Thus opined the court: Although

“…organized and regulated as an insurance company, paid the claims filed against it, and met the minimal capitalization requirements (but it)… was not operated like an insurance company, it issued policies with unclear and contradictory terms, and it charged wholly unreasonable premiums….(B)ased on the facts the court focused on, it will be vital for all captives to undergo a thorough review of their program, and to implement immediate changes”

Read more in Business Insurance.

Benefits of Better Analysis of Reputational Losses

C. HUYGENS - Thursday, August 10, 2017
“[Steel City Re's] product is innovative ... #reputational #risk can now be measured, quantified, insured, self-insured through a captive, monitored and proactively mitigated for publicly trade companies,” said John Kelly, at the Vermont Captive Insurance Association (VCIA).

Read more in the Intelligent Insurer.

Why Boards Today Need Reputation Insurances

C. HUYGENS - Tuesday, May 16, 2017
Reputation insurance is an important part of any company’s risk management strategy, according to Dr Nir Kossovsky of Steel City Re

Directors are learning the hard way that they may personally be more vulnerable than the well-known corporate brands they oversee. Directors are being targeted and replaced, with 16 percent of board members at companies we studied having been replaced after reputational events.

On average, a corporate board member makes about $250,000 per year to sit on a board and usually serves on more than one. If a reputational attack leads to that board member stepping down—and potentially not being asked to serve on additional boards—it could represent significant lost personal income
.

Read more from Captive Insurance Times

Recent Comments


SuMoTuWeThFrSa
     1
2
34
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
1516
17
1819
20
2122
23
24
25
2627282930
 

Subjects

Archive