MISSION INTANGIBLE

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MISSION:INTANGIBLE, the blog of the Intangible Asset Finance Society, offers critical comments on intangible asset, corporate reputation, and finance; supplemented by quantitative reputation metrics. Intangible assets include business processes, patents, trademarks; reputations for ethics and integrity; quality, safety, sustainability, security, and resilience; and comprise 70% of the average company's value. MISSION:INTANGIBLE is a registered trademark of the Intangible Asset Finance Society.

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Tsk tsk, Liska

Nir Kossovsky - Monday, April 20, 2009
You may have heard about the spat between Motorola Inc. (NYSE:MOT) and its former CFO, Paul Liska. Briefly, Liska believes he was dismissed for blowing the whistle on inaccurate financial forecasts; Motorola's version is that he was dismissed for "serious misconduct and incompetence."

Our interest was piqued by a recent JP Morgan analysis that reported "this entire soap opera likely ends with little or no impact to Motorola." We are less sanguine for we see evidence of significant , albeit restorable, reputation impairment.

Liska was dismissed 29 January. He was officially fired 19 February according to an SEC filing. As shown below, between 2 and 9 February, Motorola's reputation as measured by the Steel City Re Intangible Asset Finance (corporate reputation) Index dropped precipitously from the 82nd percentile to the 23rd percentile among 93 companies in the Communications Equipment sector.


The data indicate a decreasing IA index, an increasing EWMA IA index volatility with an average log magnitude of 4, and a not unexpected economic underperformance of 3% below peers. In contrast, Qualcomm Inc. (NASDAQ:QCOM) the #1 ranked firm in this sector, shows a decreasing EWMA IA index volatility with an average log magnitude of 3, and an economic return that exceeds its peers by 41%

We believe Motorola's reputation issues are significant and now center about the core issue of ethics. This additional concern exacerbates pre-existing concerns about innovation which have dogged the company for some time. To stakeholders facing ambiguous facts as they now stand, ethical concerns place all executive pronouncements under a cloud. The discounting effect on share price, in our opinion, is similar to the discounting we saw years ago when Research in Motion was laboring under the uncertainty of intellectual property litigation.

It doesn't have to be this way. Operational transparency and some fine footwork by corporate communications should be able to undo the damage if indeed, as JP Morgan suggests, Motorola's case is the stronger of the two. The reward for success by our estimation, if you want to put a number to it, is up to $11B in restored market capitalization (F-test 10E-30, adj. R2 0.79). But as most companies are learning in these challenging times, in reality, reputation is priceless.

Imposing behavior

Nir Kossovsky - Tuesday, April 07, 2009
Cadbury plc (NYSE:CBY), Kellogg (NYSE:K), Mattel (NYSE:MAT) are iconic firms whose products, cash flows, and reputations have been sullied by their business partners through ethical breaches including melamine in milk, salmonella in peanut butter, and lead paint. These three are but a sample of firms afflicted by an epidemic of trading partner (third party) risk who have placed their corporate reputation at financial peril.

Risk & Insurance magazine's senior editor, Dan Reynolds, reviews the Society's conference call from 3 April with the leading question, "Imposing best practices on trading partners today is considered vital, but how does one secure an increasingly global trading community?"  He then brilliantly summarizes Robert Rittereiser's hour-long presentation in a short, entertaining and accessible article.

Rittereiser knows risk. As Reynolds summarizes, "In Rittereiser's deep past, he was a chief financial officer and chief administrative officer of Merrill Lynch & Co. and a president and CEO of E.F. Hutton. On Wall Street, according to press coverage from his glory days, he had a reputation as a guy people hired to solve problems. These days, he is on the board or serving as an officer with several risk management companies, including the Pittsburgh, Pa.-based companies
Zhi Verden and Steel City Re."
 
To link to the the Risk & Insurance article,
click here. To acess the original slides from the Intangible Asset Finance Society call or inquire about purchasing a recording, click here.

Introducing MISSION:INTANGIBLE

Nir Kossovsky - Monday, April 06, 2009
Dear Reader,

Beginning this week and with surprising regularity, the Society will post a quantitative and qualitative analysis of the intangible asset management implications of a current news story involving a publicly traded company. These analyses will draw on IA index data published by Steel City Re. Periodically, the Society will also post announcements to supplement the monthly news alerts, the quarterly newsletter, and the bimonthly publication in IAM magazine.

As always, the Society welcomes your comments and feedback.

Nir Kossovsky
Executive Secretary

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