MISSION INTANGIBLE

M:I Products

MISSION:INTANGIBLE, the blog of the Intangible Asset Finance Society, offers critical comments on intangible asset, corporate reputation, and finance; supplemented by quantitative reputation metrics. Intangible assets include business processes, patents, trademarks; reputations for ethics and integrity; quality, safety, sustainability, security, and resilience; and comprise 70% of the average company's value. MISSION:INTANGIBLE is a registered trademark of the Intangible Asset Finance Society.

Read future M:I posts via RSS RSS

Unrealistic Expectations Create Risk of Earnings Torpedo

C. HUYGENS - Saturday, September 09, 2017
A reminder of the value of corporate governance and prompt candid disclosure of bad news especially when expectations are unrealistic.

“…the longer a company takes to come clean, the bigger and more damaging the ‘earnings torpedo’ that hits its share price and its reputation once the true numbers come out.”

Read more in Financial Times.

Ethics Scandal Wipes Out Another Professional Services Firm

C. HUYGENS - Friday, September 08, 2017
PR agency Bell Pottinger loses fight to retain clients and salvage its reputation; ethics scandal sends UK arm into administration.

“In a damning report, the Public Relations and Communications Association concluded that its messaging for the Guptas targeted wealthy white individuals and corporates in South Africa and was likely to inflame racial tensions. Since Monday, a host of big name clients and companies have sought to distance themselves from Bell Pottinger with HSBC, TalkTalk and Ascential joining luxury brands group Richemont and Investec in publicly abandoning the firm.”

Read more in Financial Times.

Headline-Sourced Reputation Risk

C. HUYGENS - Wednesday, August 23, 2017
“We’re in the era of weaponized social media….Companies need to set clear expectations of what (behavior) is acceptable.”

“Companies need to communicate with stakeholders about the values embedded in their corporate culture and set clear expectations of what is acceptable and what is not. In the current political climate, companies should have been considering this question all along, not just waiting for (Charlottesville) to stimulate that discussion. ”

Read more in Business Insurance.

Industry Under Siege (No, its not banking)

C. HUYGENS - Wednesday, August 09, 2017
“When commentators routinely compare Silicon Valley today with the arrogance, isolation and destructive might of Wall Street before the crash 10 years ago this week, it is time to start thinking about reputation — and what might ensue when the glamorous superficial allure of these tech giants wears off.”

Read more in the Financial Times.

Reputation Risk Due to Ethical Controls Failure

C. HUYGENS - Monday, July 31, 2017
Germany's big three groups, Volkswagen, Daimler and BMW, and VW units Porsche and Audi have been accused of holding secret meetings and colluding on technology. There are controls to prevent such ethical breaches. How can they fail?

“German managers are less aware of the financial consequences of wrongdoing than their US counterparts,” she says. There is less of a recognition that fines imposed by regulators for lawbreaking “can sometimes be so big they can ruin the company”.

Read more in the Financial Times.

Crisis Communicator Creates Reputational Crisis

C. HUYGENS - Sunday, July 09, 2017
Crisis communicator culpable for reputational crisis with false news stirring up racial tensions. It is a question of ethics.

“Much of what has been alleged about our work is, we believe, not true — but enough of it is to be of deep concern,” Mr Henderson (Bell Pottinger’s CEO) added. “These activities should never have been undertaken.”

Read more in the Financial Times.

Measure of the Reputation Crisis at Uber

C. HUYGENS - Monday, June 19, 2017
Cornerstones of #reputation—ethics and security— and weaponized social media exacerbate #risk per Steel City Re.

Uber’s annual growth in the US slowed to 40 per cent at the end of May, from 55 per cent in the previous year, according to the data from Second Measure.

An onslaught by San Francisco-based Lyft, is taking its toll, with Uber’s US market share dropping from 84 per cent at the beginning of this year to 77 per cent at the end of May, according to data from Second Measure, a research firm that uses anonymised credit card data.

Uber’s decline in market share was fuelled by the #DeleteUber campaign at the end of January, which encouraged users to stop using the company due to Mr Kalanick’s role on President Donald Trump’s business advisory council. The campaign hit hardest in New York, Boston and San Francisco, some of Uber’s top 10 US markets.

Read more in the Financial Times.

Paying Down the Costs of a Reputation Crisis

C. HUYGENS - Tuesday, May 09, 2017
More going-forward costs of #reputation #risk -- now burning furniture.

San Francisco-based bank Wells Fargo & Co. is considering selling its insurance brokerage unit for about $2 billion, Bloomberg reported Tuesday.

Citing “people familiar with the matter,” Bloomberg said Wells Fargo is contacting private equity firms to determine the interest in Wells Fargo Insurance Services USA Inc. The bank is planning to move forward with a sale, Bloomberg reported, but it hasn’t set a timeline for holding a formal auction, one of the people said.


Read more in the Business Insurance.

Paying the Ongoing Costs of a Reputation Crisis

C. HUYGENS - Monday, May 08, 2017
#Reputation #Risk “Corporate names are resilient: when their images get damaged, a change of management or strategy will often revive their fortunes. But personal reputations are fragile: mess with them and it can be fatal,” wrote John Gapper for the Financial Times in August, 2016.

Wells Fargo is preparing to unveil new cost-cutting measures as the scandal-hit US bank tries to rebuild Wall Street’s confidence after a bruising annual meeting with shareholders.

Tim Sloan, chief executive, is this week expected to reveal plans for annual savings at Wells, the world’s third-biggest bank by market capitalisation, of as much as $3bn — on top of an existing $2bn expense-reduction plan.


Read more in the Financial Times.

Wells Fargo: Legal Bills Pile Up

C. HUYGENS - Friday, May 05, 2017
#Reputation #risk Entry level losses based on 6000 events average 24% market cap, 13% sales, and 12% net income. Values vary by industry sector, year, and underlying causes.

Wells Fargo has warned its litigation bill could be $200m higher than previously thought as the US bank sheds new light on a series of lawsuits it is facing over the bogus account scandal.

In a quarterly filing on Friday, Wells said “reasonably possible” losses from legal actions against it could exceed its existing provisions by $2bn — up from a $1.8bn figure it disclosed three months ago.

The document shows how lawsuits are piling up against Wells after thousands of its employees, under pressure to hit sales targets, turned to fraud. Workers signed up as many as 2.1m customers for cards and accounts over several years without their authorisation or consent, in some cases faking signatures.


Read more in the Financial Times.

Recent Comments


SuMoTuWeThFrSa
   1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
1213
14
15
16
17
18
19
202122232425
2627282930  
 

Subjects

Archive