MISSION INTANGIBLE

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MISSION:INTANGIBLE, the blog of the Intangible Asset Finance Society, offers critical comments on intangible asset, corporate reputation, and finance; supplemented by quantitative reputation metrics. Intangible assets include business processes, patents, trademarks; reputations for ethics and integrity; quality, safety, sustainability, security, and resilience; and comprise 70% of the average company's value. MISSION:INTANGIBLE is a registered trademark of the Intangible Asset Finance Society.

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Reputational Impact of Responsible Behavior

C. HUYGENS - Thursday, July 27, 2017
What regulatory reputational resilience looks like according to SEC Chairman Jay Clayton in the context of cyber security:

“If a company is being responsible . . . I don’t think we should then be punishing them for being a victim..."

Read more in the Financial Times.

Executives Become the Personification of Stakeholder Dissatisfaction

C. HUYGENS - Wednesday, July 26, 2017
"Whenever there’s a corporate misstep, stakeholders, from activist investors to customers to politicians, are giving public voice to their anger through social media, doing damage not only to corporate brands, but to individuals in corporate leadership positions.…The executives who are vilified during a crisis become the personification of stakeholder dissatisfaction. When they are targeted, the personal losses can be devastating."

Read more in the CEO World.

Email Reputation Risk: Summer 2017 Edition

C. HUYGENS - Wednesday, July 19, 2017
Reputational risk is the risk of a verdict of culpability with prejudice and damages for emotional harm in the court of public opinion. The purpose of a reputation risk management strategy is to foster reputational resilience and a verdict of exculpation due to mitigating factors, according to Nir Kossovsky of Steel City Re.

“The entire notion of reputational risk is essentially a battle for the mind of the stakeholder. When a bad thing happens — as they always do — will the stakeholder say, ‘Yeah, that’s a bad thing, but it’s such a good company. It’s unfortunate, but they’re good people and they’ll recover.’  Or will they say ‘Yep, that’s what we expected. That’s a bad company and that’s one more thing we expected to come out of them.’”

Reputation risk management products such as insurances that behave like warranties help foster reputational resilience.

Read more in the Business Insurance.

Crisis Communicator Creates Reputational Crisis

C. HUYGENS - Sunday, July 09, 2017
Crisis communicator culpable for reputational crisis with false news stirring up racial tensions. It is a question of ethics.

“Much of what has been alleged about our work is, we believe, not true — but enough of it is to be of deep concern,” Mr Henderson (Bell Pottinger’s CEO) added. “These activities should never have been undertaken.”

Read more in the Financial Times.

Reputation Crises Experienced Personally

C. HUYGENS - Thursday, June 29, 2017
“When reputational crises hit, market cap, sales, margins and profits are all on the line…but it’s not only the corporate entity that faces challenges – individuals in leadership, particularly CEOs, face personal risk as well.”

Read more in the Property Casualty 360.

Reputation Crisis Triggers Bloodbath at Uber

C. HUYGENS - Tuesday, June 27, 2017
Uber has become a charnel house

“The ferocity and velocity of attacks in this era of weaponized social media often leads companies to try to satisfy the blood lust with human sacrifice – in the form of resignations, terminations and compensation claw-backs.”

Read more in the Insurance Business America.

Wells Fargo: Regulators and Litigators Want Board Member Scalps

C. HUYGENS - Thursday, June 22, 2017
Regulators and litigators want board member scalps--Buffet may be outgunned. The reputation crisis at Wells Fargo now enters the regulatory phase, which by Steel City Re's metrics, is typically a very costly process.

"I urge you to exercise your legal authority to remove the holdover Wells Fargo Board members. Federal Reserve regulations and guidance impose clear risk-management obligations on the Board — obligations that are quite demanding for a bank as large and complex as Wells Fargo," Warren wrote. "The Board did nothing to stop rampant misconduct in the Community Bank that resulted in more than 5000 bank employees creating more than two million fake accounts over four years."

Read more in Business Insider.

Board Allowed Long-lasting Reputational Damage to Wells Fargo

C. HUYGENS - Wednesday, June 21, 2017
Senator Warren, writing to the Fed demanding the removal of all 12 directors of Wells Fargo…

…argues in the letter that the directors failed in their risk-management obligations, resulting in "massive financial losses" and "long-lasting reputational damage to the bank that has eroded the bank's customer base."

Read more in the Business Insider.

Another CEO Head, This Time Deservedly, Handed to God(s) of Reputation

C. HUYGENS - Wednesday, June 21, 2017
From the man who noted last week that Uber was suffering from a “reputational deficit”.

“There will be many pages in the history books devoted to [Travis Kalanick],” wrote Bill Gurley, an Uber board member representing one of the firms that demanded Mr Kalanick’s resignation, in a tweet. “Very few entrepreneurs have had such a lasting impact on the world.”

Read more in the Financial Times.

Measure of the Reputation Crisis at Uber

C. HUYGENS - Monday, June 19, 2017
Cornerstones of #reputation—ethics and security— and weaponized social media exacerbate #risk per Steel City Re.

Uber’s annual growth in the US slowed to 40 per cent at the end of May, from 55 per cent in the previous year, according to the data from Second Measure.

An onslaught by San Francisco-based Lyft, is taking its toll, with Uber’s US market share dropping from 84 per cent at the beginning of this year to 77 per cent at the end of May, according to data from Second Measure, a research firm that uses anonymised credit card data.

Uber’s decline in market share was fuelled by the #DeleteUber campaign at the end of January, which encouraged users to stop using the company due to Mr Kalanick’s role on President Donald Trump’s business advisory council. The campaign hit hardest in New York, Boston and San Francisco, some of Uber’s top 10 US markets.

Read more in the Financial Times.

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