MISSION INTANGIBLE

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MISSION:INTANGIBLE, the blog of the Intangible Asset Finance Society, offers critical comments on intangible asset, corporate reputation, and finance; supplemented by quantitative reputation metrics. Intangible assets include business processes, patents, trademarks; reputations for ethics and integrity; quality, safety, sustainability, security, and resilience; and comprise 70% of the average company's value. MISSION:INTANGIBLE is a registered trademark of the Intangible Asset Finance Society.

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Barclays: What new sheriff?

C. HUYGENS - Thursday, February 27, 2014
After a run of scandals at the global bank, it was hoped that the new boss, Antony Jenkins, would right Barclays' (BCS) tilted culture and restore its reputation. Last year, Huygens shared this encouraging indicator of commitment from Barclay's annual report:

In order to strengthen the governance relating to reputation matters, we have recategorised reputation risk as a new Principal Risk and have created a Board Conduct, Reputation and Operational Risk Committee in 2013. The Barclays Reputation Council created a Bank wide Reputation Risk Control Framework and Reputation Risk Impact/Control Policy, both of which were approved by the Board. The Council has also delivered training on reputation risk to senior executives across the bank to ensure the knowledge and culture is embedded.

Fast forward some 48 weeks and the expectations set by those lofty words appear hollow. As Jonathan Salem Baskin noted last week, the bank's reputation is still wrecked.

Moving from the qualitative to the quantitative, the reputational value profile of Barclays, according to Consensiv and based on Steel City Re's reputational value metrics, is shown below. The Reputation Premium is at the 10th percentile relative to 49 companies in the Major Banks sectors, and the Consensus Trend, CT, has been hovering below both 2.5% and the median of the peer group. The Consensus Benchmark is 6.4%.

These data suggest that stakeholders, like Charlie Brown, have repeatedly raised their expectations only to be disappointed time and again. Control processes and communications are both being under-managed, and much value is being destroyed in the wake of failed governance.



For more background on the Consensiv reputation controls, click here. To view the December 2013 reputational value league table, based on Consensiv's metrics, and available exclusively at CFO.com, click here. Last, to read more about how reputational value is linked to stakeholder expectations and enterprise value, read, Reputation Stock Price and You: Why the market rewards some companies and punishes others (Apress, 2012) (click here).

Barclays: Committed

C. HUYGENS - Sunday, March 17, 2013
Cynics insist that the big banks have only an interest in reputation -- an interest that distributes risk inequitably on others. As the old fable goes:

A Pig and a Chicken are walking down the road. The Chicken says: "Hey Pig, I was thinking we should open a restaurant!" Pig replies: "Hm, maybe, what would we call it?" The Chicken responds: "How about 'ham-n-eggs'?" The Pig thinks for a moment and says: "No thanks. I'd be committed, but you'd only be involved!"

Last year, UBS tied the CEO's bonus to measures of reputation. Now, a second bank is no longer chicken. In a bigger and bolder display of commitment, the 2012 Barclays Bank Annual Report describes robust board and operational level controls designed to drive reputation risk management throughout the enterprise.

In order to strengthen the governance relating to reputation matters, we have recategorised reputation risk as a new Principal Risk and have created a Board Conduct, Reputation and Operational Risk Committee in 2013. The Barclays Reputation Council created a Bank wide Reputation Risk Control Framework and Reputation Risk Impact/Control Policy, both of which were approved by the Board. The Council has also delivered training on reputation risk to senior executives across the bank to ensure the knowledge and culture is embedded.

The Steel City Re Reputational Value Metrics suggest Barclays is realizing some of the rewards associated with transparently reporting its commitment. RVM is a non-financial indicator of reputational value. The current RVM volatility, an indicator of homogeneity of expectations of reputational value, has been dropping steadily over the past 4 weeks since Huygens last reported the metrics.  Meanwhile, the CRR, a measure of relative reputational value in rank order, shows that BCS has climbed from the 21st to 24th percentile since mid-Feb. ROE is holding steady at just above the median for the sector comprising 49 banking firms.

The data show that BCS's emphasis on reputation, backed by authentic controls, is creating value. The controls have not been tested, so those that have been converted appreciate the qualitative effort. The data also show that while the number of sceptics is dropping, BCS current RVM volatility is still above the median at the 54th percentile. To extract more value from the investment, BCS needs to turn around this very large block of sceptics with a quantitative story -- something made possible by a product like reputational value insurance, perhaps?



Barclays: Stirring the pot

C. HUYGENS - Wednesday, February 20, 2013
The path to providence for a prodigal bank was never expected to be easy. Human nature delights in the fall of the mighty; more so the meek who once suffered at their hands. We are speaking, of course, of the hands of the masters of the Universe.

William D. Cohan, the author of “Money and Power: How Goldman Sachs Came to Rule the World,” is a Bloomberg View columnist. He was formerly an investment banker at Lazard Freres, Merrill Lynch and JPMorgan Chase. He scoffs as Antony Jenkins, the chief executive officer of Barclays Plc., seeks to shred the banks old culture and restore ethics, integrity, and other critical values. Cohan wrote on Monday,

It’s tempting to trust this sweet-talking British banking executive, still in the flush of his new appointment to run the scandal-ridden institution. He is understandably anxious to distance himself and his bank from the atrocious behavior rampant at Barclays during the absolute monarchy of his predecessor, Robert Diamond.

Scoffing, as it is now abundantly clear, is a mainstream financial media concern. Last Thursday, the NYSE announced the start of a metric-based publication service tracking sentiment - a social media data analysis service. Call it a scoff meter. Barbara Gray, an analyst with Brady Capital, explains the demand in the financial sector for sentiment data this way.

Social media is creating a new form of appreciating equity called social capital and we are now starting to see an explosion in growth of the number and sophistication of social analytics tools. As these new tools turn more and more qualitative data on companies (previously ignored by investors that just focused on the numbers) into quantitative data, I believe social capital will become even more of a predictive variable for determining stock price performance.

Indeed, the scoff meter is a 17 year old idea whose time has come. As described in Reputation, Stock Price and You, as far back as 1996, Cap Gemini Ernst & Young, a global accountancy, established that non-financial performance plays a critical role in how public companies are valued, accounting for as much as 35% of institutional investors’ valuation. In 2005, PwC, another global accountancy, reported controlled experiments showing that extra-financial data and intangible asset value calculations swayed 40% of analysts to change their target valuations of public companies. That same year, Thomson Extel, the publishing group, reported that 6% of buy-side brokerages devoted material resources to extra-financial data to determine intangible asset value. A year later, that figure was updated to 32% of buy-side brokerages.

The Society, in cooperation with Steel City Re, has been publishing reputational value metrics for several years. S&P/DowJones Indexes publishes an equity index (Ticker: REPUVAR)  informed by the same measures. These measures capture the expected economic consequences of stakeholder actions influenced by, among other things, the same data streams tracked by the scoff meters. In fact, the volatility of the RVM metric, a non-financial measure of reputational value, is a measure of stakeholder expectation alignment -- truly, a scoff meter. And CRR, a measure of reputational value premium, is an indicator of the relative value of those expectations among all stakeholders in terms of expected economic impact. When RVM volatilty is high, CRR naturally suffers.

Below, Barclays' most recent data from Steel City Re in both Investor Relations-friendly and traditional Risk Manager-centered actuarial formats. Looking first at the IR-friendly form of reputational value reporting, the data show that the measures of expectation alignment - the degree to which stakeholders believe what is being said about Barclays and plan to act accordingly, is around the 8th percentile relative to the other 49 firms in the financial services sector. The measure captures the expected economic impact of Cohan's scoffing, as shown on the same Peer Standing chart where the reputational value premium is around the 21st percentile. Two measures, both in the black box, indicating (optimistically) great upside potential.

Below, in the bottom left, a comparison of current alignment versus historic alignment. The measure appears to be decreasing, which could be interpreted to mean stakeholders are trusting the messaging less, or more aptly here, with the new messaging, stakeholders aren't accepting it...reference Cohan again.

Turning to more traditional economic measures, the Beta charts at right show that Barclays' economic returns have a Beta of 1.5 x both the group median and the S&P500; Barclays' reputational value metrics, on the other hand, have a Beta of 0.0 relative to the group median and the market measure of uncertainty -- the VIX. Barclays, from a reputational value perspective, is now in a league of its own.



The story is no different looking at the actuarial data below although time series data provide more nuanced insight. Barclays wild ride goes back to September 2012 and a steady rise in economic value not yet matched by a rise in CRR suggesting equity investors have a feeling for something others, like Cohan, are fighting tooth, nail, and blog.

Barclays: CEO’s ethics talk creates value

C. HUYGENS - Sunday, February 10, 2013
There are three types of companies that can benefit from tinkering with the business bits that underpin reputation. Iconic firms can build in reputational resilience to help them in their ongoing battle with NGOs. Good firms in commodity businesses can signal points of value-added differentiation. The last group, of which Barclays is an unhappy member, can signal material efforts at repairing that which has caused them in the recent past reputational value loss.

The good news for Barclays and similarly situated firms is that evidence shows that reputation restoration works and, all things being equal, can create an additional 6.5% in market capitalization. The other good news for Barclays Plc is that Chief Executive Officer Antony Jenkins’s pledge to shred the legacy of his predecessor and fix the lender’s culture, as reported by Bloomberg,  appears to be creating value as stakeholder expectations are realligning.

The reputational value metrics, calculated by Steel City Re, show two important shifts. The volatility of RVM, a non-financial measure of reputational value, is high and rising. The value and direction of change of CRR, a measure of relative reputational ranking (the reputational value premium), is now above the median level for the 49 peers, and is rising rapidly. Profits and the commensurate equity bump, are sure to follow.




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